Show #001 – Juggle! ReThink Work, Reclaim your Life

I’m delighted to kick off our podcast series with a fascinating chat with Ian Sanders of The Ian Sanders Company on his latest book Juggle! Rethink Work, Reclaim your Life

Ian Sanders is an entrepreneur, ideas guy, marketing bloke, business potentialiser, unplan evangelist, specialist in creative industries and author!

You can either listen to the podcast from your computer now or you can subscribe to listen to this and future episodes on your ipod, smart phone or mp3 player at your convenience – all for free.

In our 20 minute chat, topics covered with Ian include:

  • Ian’s life as a Juggler
  • introducing ‘plurality’ into our work and lives
  • avoiding being defined by our job title
  • how employees can also embrace the Juggle lifestyle to be more entrepreneurial
  • how the introduction of a reduced (often 4 day) work week during the recession could benefit both employers and employees over the longer term
  • rethinking the notion of retirement by reframing work
  • challenge of ‘switching off’ given the ‘always on’ 24 hr nature of technology tools
  • key lessons from Kevin Roberts (global CEO of Saatchi & Saatchi) on balancing work and life
  • importance of being passionate about what you do – “play where you play best”
  • effectively managing your 24 hours per day

You can find this book at Amazon and you can find more from Ian Sanders at his website, plus regular updates on Ian’s latest thinking on his blog and on Twitter.

How you can listen to BusinessN2K:

  1. Subscribe by clicking on the Subscribe to Podcast icon in the side bar or subscribe via iTunes. This is the best way to listen as it will ensure that all future episodes are delivered directly to you as new episodes are released, or
  2. Click on the Blubrry player below to listen now:

Blubrry player!

Please leave your comments, feedback and suggestions for future shows in the comments section below.

Credits: Thanks to Ian Sanders for this week’s show + music used in the BusinessN2K podcast is by Viba – In the Orchard lies a Secret – available as a free download and is released under a Creative Commons Licence

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Who’s in charge of your business?

UNSPECIFIED - OCTOBER 10:  In this photo illus...
Image by Getty Images via Daylife

You may think that you are in charge of your business, however, in the digital age of social media where anyone has the power to comment on your business and influence both local and global opinion (either via blogs, Twitter, forums, Facebook etc), is this still the case?

There have been many recent high-profile incidents where global brands have been forced to change direction commercially or, at the very least, acknowledge the comments and feedback of disgruntled customers whether they wanted to or not e.g. Dell, Apple are a amongst a distinguished line-up of apologetic global brands.

A few harsh and frank words typed into a blog, Facebook, Twitter or a video review posted to YouTube has the power:

  • at worst to bring about a viral movement resulting in an army of disappointed individuals congregating online who collectively could cause serious harm to your business, or
  • at the very least rank some negative feedback within Google ready to leap out the next time your dream prospect does a search on your business in Google (and they will).

There is nothing you can do to stop this – and why should you?

Feedback is a gift after all whether positive or negative. It is how you deal with negative feedback that is key when the eyes of the world are watching…

A recent study showed that potential customers warmed more to businesses who had negative feedback but took proactive steps to remedy the complaints compared to those that bathed solely in positive feedback. However, for this strategy to be effective it is vital that you are listening for comments made online about your business – and act on it (quickly).

A good example is my local hostelry, The Swan Hotel in Tarporley. A thoroughly nice country pub and hotel with largely 4-5 stars on Trip Advisor. However, scroll down through the recent reviews (as most people do) and you can’t help but be drawn to a review that gives 1 star and says “Child unfriendly”. Read on and the reviewer goes on to berate the hotel and service for a whole host of cock-ups. Left unattended this review leaves a huge black mark against the rest of the positive reviews and, on personal a note as a father, I’m sure I would be scouring through for alternative child friendly options.

The good news is that the owners of the Swan Hotel were listening and promptly posted the following apology under the review:

Problem (not only) solved but turned into a positive.

Be under no illusion, you are no longer in charge of how your business is perceived. Your business will be held accountable for every action it takes and it will receive continual feedback. Your job as business owner, manager or employee is to listen, respond, engage and use the feedback to continually improve and adapt your products and services.

In this way, your millions of managers can help keep your business on track far better than you could alone.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Professionals serving clients via The Cloud

As a practising chartered accountant and tax advisor, I am finding that the ability to reach out and service clients via The Cloud is getting easier (and even more fun). 

Two recent examples from the past week:

  1. Sat at my Mac when I was pinged via Skype by one of my contacts “Steve, do you have a moment to help?”.  Within seconds he had sent me a link via Yuuguu for me to view his screen.  He was busy trying to file his company CT600 tax return online but was encountering some problems.  There is a further option on the screen that allowed me to take control of his screen so that I could quickly rifle through the online pages to determine if anything was wrong.  Meanwhile we could discuss via online chat.  A v slick experience and a glimpse into the way we will work in the future (now)!
  2. Leaving the gym, a client wanted me to check some recent accounting entries to his online business books.  With no time to get back to the office, I stopped by a local Pret-A-Manger and sat down with my laptop to hook up to the free wifi.  I tried to connect to Skype via my ipod Touch (as Skype is not installed on my work laptop) but unfortunately the connection was patchy.  A quick log-in to Twitter to apologise for the delay and my client sent an access link to his online accounting package, Xero, via a direct message in Twitter.  Within seconds I was logged into his Xero account reviewing the accounting entries.  The review was limited as I wanted to discuss some points with him (and a public place like Pret is not ideal), however, to get a heads up on the fly, this was great. 

Who would have thought this way of working would be possible only a couple of years ago? 

Example 1 could not have happened as I was not in the office at the time.  Example 2 would have meant a significant delay and frustration for my client awaiting my return to the office etc.   In both cases, these tools enabled me to be more responsive and allowed me to work without being chained to my desk. 

Professionals need to be out of the office supporting the business community and these tech tools are allowing this to become a reality. 

On a personal note, many of my clients are technology companies and they (quite rightly) expect their advisers to operate and work utilising similar tools – great news for me!

What might this mean for the way professionals work in the (near) future?

Manchester – Next Generation Digital City

A packed auditorium at Manchester’s Bridgewater Hall on Friday 15 January 2010 was greeted by an enthusiastic launch by Insider of Manchester – Next Generation Digital City.

An initiative that aims to put Manchester at the forefront of UK business competitiveness by laying the foundations for exciting, innovative digital and technology-based businesses to flourish.  This will be achieved by leading the pack (well, a close second behind North Wales) in laying state-of-the-art fibre networks to deliver blistering broadband speed for businesses (and residential users).  To put things in perspective, the example was given by Geo, Chief Executive, Chris Smedley (the company that will lay the cables) of a residential user seeking to download a typical 4GB movie  – today this would practically take all day to download whereas this could be downloaded in just 46 seconds once the new networks are laid!

Dave Carter (Head of Manchester Digital Development Agency) in particular roused the audience with an impassioned plea for Manchester to lead the charge, citing frustration over push-backs and retorts such as:

  1. “There is no market for this otherwise the market would have invested in and built it themselves” – how about the importance of the Manchester Ship Canal to Manchester’s economic prominence in the early industrial age as a counter to this….?
  2. “This is too fast for most existing applications – why do we want this now?” – because businesses will find ways to utilise it to its full potential once it is there to be used – the burgeoning Manchester creative and film industry needs this now as explained by Dave Mousley of Red Vision
  3. “Let’s wait and see how other cities get on before we invest” – Dave Carter likened this to sitting out the next Olympics to see how other countries fared in the hope that we could steal a march next time – it just doesn’t work this way!

References to “iPhone to iManc” and the quest to follow the likes of Stockholm and Amsterdam to become Smart Cities were also crowd-pleasers.

I sensed that the excitement was mixed with a little frustration when the test-bed area was shown as a disappointingly small pocket of North Manchester – before being extended across Manchester in due course.  Equally, the innovative idea of using existing sewerage and tram line systems to lay the networks rather than causing the disruption of digging up roads etc was tinged with concern when a throw-away comment was made by Chris Smedley that they still needed to reach agreement with United Utilities plc who own the sewerage systems …. a point that was picked up by a member of the audience during the Q&A.

Brendan Dawes (Creative Director of Magnetic North) made the poigniant point that he looked forward to the day when he could move on from living in what sometimes appears to be a Victorian Age and enjoy the advancements of living in a digital 21st Century  e.g. he currently wakes up in a Victorian town to travel to work on a Victorian tramline to admire the Victorian Manchester architechture  – “if only the wireless 3G network would allow Spotify to work properly whilst sitting on the tram!”

Another discussion which sparked interest was the notion that truly opening up to the potential of the digital age could allow individuals (young and old) to make game-changing products and services.  Digital business is a leveller in providing a level playing field for both small and BIG corporate businesses.   Reference was made by Brendan to a young guy who he met at SXSW who said he was leaving Apple to set up a new business with Jack Dorsey (co-founder of Twitter).  This business turns out to be the recently launched Square – a game-changing business that is set to blow credit card providers and potentially even cash into the dark ages:

“and this was created by a kid and NOT some corporate team in suits working for one of the major banking institutions.”

A great point well made.

If you’ve yet to see the potential of Square – here’s a taster:

I had to leave the event promptly for a client meeting so I was unable to hang around to chat, however, I couldn’t help but feel that this was the right sentiment and that things are going in the right direction but we need to see the test-bed site rolled out as soon as possible before a) there is the risk of loss of momentum and / or b) the nay-sayers sense weakness and put the brakes on.  There is also a potential change in government that could derail this ambitious project given public and fiscal tightening.

Let’s hope that the first fibre networks are laid as soon as possible as I believe that what might seem like a bold move now is likely to be viewed as one of the best things that Manchester ever did in years to come (like the Manchester Ship Canal).

Please share your views.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Forward thinking Engineering business supports future NW innovation

I enjoyed a great catch-up with the Managing Director (MD) of a (target) company of mine today.  This family owned business is a leading advanced engineering company in the North West and the MD’s insights into business and the way things are changing is always sharp and insightful.

We discussed the economic challenges of the past 12 months and, given the long life-cycle of procuring and then manufacturing their products he saw the next 6-12 months as a period of “consolidation”.  Many of their competitors had already been squeezed out, although he suspected there would be more to come – especially as businesses who survive then suffer from over-trading as the market (hopefully) returns “in around 2012” – the mantra Cash is King will remain as crucial as ever.

What was most interesting was the sense of cohesiveness mixed with a strong focus and direction that he was building within the organisation.  The tough times over the past 12-18 months have clearly made them much more focused on their core strengths and therefore more inclined to sub-contract the work that they do not believe they can do as well – this is brave but strategically right for the longer term. Likewise they are actively seeking opportunities to assist other engineering firms with their expertise and resource to help meet demands or short term resource needs.  A flexible approach that the MD could see being a key growth area in the business.

They have also continued along a path of identifying and nurturing new and emerging engineering talent within the North West – an area which is of strategic importance for them over the longer term but which is clearly already bringing success.  This commitment to supporting early stage engineering ideas and businesses is crucial to the future of the North West economy and is refreshing to see within a long established family company.

Picking up on the team cohesiveness, the MD explained how his choice of location for their new offices was largely dictated by where his team live (“we really wanted to keep them”) and how he would like to increase the commitment of the business to social responsibility by allowing staff to complete 4 week sabbaticals on hands-on roles such as building orphanages in Africa in the not too distant future – all on full-pay.  Notwithstanding such lofty goals, the MD was both surprised and warmed by the team’s response to his impromptu decision to give all staff an extra 2 days holiday over Christmas this year – “I’ve handed out pretty decent bonuses in the past and have been greeted with a “thanks (but I’ve earned it)” kind of response but was stunned by the response to this gesture!”

A great business with a great leader.  We need more like it.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

What Matters Now – Soul Business

Riffing off Seth Godin (and his collaborators’) contributions to the fantastic and recently published What Matters Now ebook, I thought I would add my one-pager (should Seth have asked me to contribute – maybe next time huh?)

What Matters Now?

Soul Business

Making meaning through business.  Solving global problems.  Engaging people in work that fulfills them. Making cool stuff. Existing for more than making a profit.  Businesses that make meaning.  Business can have soul.

Big business (used) to make the rules.  They made stuff that generates the biggest profits.  Enroll staff to work and make the stuff.  Pump millions of £s into advertising to make people want to buy the stuff that the big companies are making.  It has no enduring meaning.  Everyone knew it, there just wasn’t the ready means to challenge or change it (you needed money, and lots of it).  Business lost soul.

The internet has changed everything.  It allows mom and pop businesses to flourish from the kitchen table. It allows people who might otherwise never meet to collaborate to make cool stuff.  To put passion into business. To build businesses that make a difference to society.  To the world.  To challenge (slow, lumbering) big businesses through the delivery of new services or products, unparalled customer service and an overarching authenticity and meaning that resonates with customers. Business can use soul for competitive advantage.

The internet has also added one other killer advantage for small business: low cost.  There is now nothing stopping small ‘kitchen table’ businesses from competing side by side with major established big businesses.  Cool stuff can be made and then marketed online before being shipped to a global customer base whilst consulting services can be delivered globally via the cloud. The costs and overheads of establishing and running small businesses today are low (and are getting lower). Meanwhile big businesses have large, costly, unwieldly infrastructures built over many years to meet the demands of the old 20th century economy. Business soul is indiscriminate – it favours business of all shapes and sizes.

We are standing at the threshold of a huge opportunity.  We can now focus on building and supporting throngs of small businesses that matter.  Businesses that solve global problems and needs.  Businesses that can stay small because being big is no longer a necessary constituent of being globally successful.  Businesses that engage and enthuse their people. Businesses that make meaning ahead of profit. In a nutshell, business with soul.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Great Business = Great People (and vice versa)

You often hear successful CEOs say: “I couldn’t have done it without my team” or “We’re a People Business and our people are our greatest asset”.  These hugely successful businesses all appear to have great people.

But is it the luck or skill of the CEO in finding these “great people” or is it that great businesses draw out the great in people?

I believe it is the latter – let me explain:

A great business has a clear and compelling vision.  It has a mission.  A mantra.  A reason for existing.  It is (or aims to be) the best in the world at whatever it does. It makes a difference.  A contribution to society.  The World.

A great business infuses a passion in those that work for it.  They can clearly see the vision in front of them.  They want to see the vision fulfilled.  To see the difference being made or the problem solved.  This is not ‘work’ in the ‘clock-in, clock-out sense’, this feels more like a ‘calling’.  Going to work brings a sense of fulfilment.  A strong team dynamic is established as people work together in line with the shared vision.

A great business draws out the great qualities of the people that work there.  People feel great.  People become great.  In turn, businesses become great.

So are you a “people business” and if so, what are you doing to build a great business that allows your great people to flourish?

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
1 28 29 30